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Review | Oris Regulateur Der Meistertaucher

Unboxing

They say first impressions last. And if the substantial box and water-resistant pelican case (bespoke and reserved for their professional watches) this Oris arrived in is anything to go by, they have a point.

At 49mm wide and 12mm deep, it’s a watch that could hardly be described as a thing of beauty. It is in the eye of the beholder, however, and in this respect, we're in love!

Known as the Oris Regulateur Der Meistertaucher, this is a serious tool watch for diving enthusiasts. Yet Oris knows that it will also end up on the wrist of people in pursuit of the look (the desk diver), without any intention of taking part in the pursuit itself.

The Regulateur part of the name is derived from the single minute hand (more of which later) where as Der Meistertaucher means Master Diver - the name Oris reserves for its high end dive watches. The Regulateur is an interesting concept, reserved for specialist time pieces and in a “sea” of very similar looking dive watches, quite unique in its execution.

Fit and Finish

Considering its sheer size, this robust Oris is relatively lightweight, being constructed from one of the most precious metals on Earth: Titanium. In this application, grade 2.

It is finished precisely in a way that only a well-engineered Swiss Made watch can be. And engineered is a key word here as the watch feels like a technical instrument for the wrist, rather than simply a means of telling the time.

The anti-reflective (on the inside) domed sapphire crystal takes on a bluish tinge at certain angles and it provides excellent clarity.

We mentioned that this divers is oversized as the dare we say it, "fashion" seems to be currently. However, as it is tapered from bottom to top, the 49mm case doesn't wear to that size at all. And even with a relatively modest 7 inch wrist, it fits well and is comfortable.

The black unidirectional ceramic bezel looks fantastic, with a deep sheen and clear markers, although they (as many dive watches) do not benefit from lume for use in poor light. It turns with a positive click and is easy to manipulate, with it's machined edge and as we found later, even when wearing gloves. It aligns perfectly when turned and is satisfying in operation. And consider that ceramic is nearly impossible to scratch, so it will be extremely resilient to damage when diving.

Titanium however, whilst light and impossibly strong is, surprisingly, a soft metal in comparison to steel. Whilst it isn’t easy to dent (you would have to knock the watch hard on a rock or piece of equipment to significantly damage the case), scratches show up easily so expect a certain patina to follow with age. Scratches are not always what they seem however with titanium, as the metal oxidises on contact with air. Quite often then, what appears to be a light scratch in the metal is actually only damage to this grey oxidised layer, revealing the shiny metal underneath. Therefore, light surface scratches can often be (carefully) polished out.

Titanium is also hyper-allergenic, which makes it an ideal watch material for those who suffer from skin allergies. However, one of its major advantages is that it’s highly resistant to corrosion in sea water - perfect then, for a watch designed to spend it’s time beneath the waves.

Next | Design >

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